Historians Announce Box of Gushers Discovered in Civil War Era Barn

fruit gushers

In a startling discovery last week, Civil War reenactors turned up what appears to be a box of Tropical-flavored Gushers in a barn originally built some time in the mid-19th century, and that remained standing throughout the American Civil War.

The discovery took place in Hanover, Pennsylvania–a site for many Civil War reenactments throughout the calendar year. Buried beneath layers of dirt and rotting wood, the box of Gushers has baffled historians who had previously written off the existence of Gushers during the Civil War. It was believed that Gushers had been invented by Betty Crocker foods and debuted in 1991, well beyond the end of the Civil War in America. The box was empty, leading many to believe that the pouches of gummy pellets filled with color syrup were consumed by soldiers before, during, or after the great Battle of Hanover. The battle is widely known for its delay of Confederate soldiers from reaching Gettysburg. Historians are unsure if the snacks were consumed by the Confederacy or the Union.

Buried beneath layers of dirt and rotted wood, the box of Gushers has baffled historians who had previously written off the existence of Gushers during the Civil War.

The box has been confiscated from the grounds by the American Historical Association. The feeling is that the AHA will examine and preserve the box of Gushers for authenticity. The hope, though, is that the box will then be on display for the public to view.

The American Civil War has no shortage of stories or perspectives by historians. This new revelation may put a dent in many theories. Who made Gushers if Betty Crocker hadn’t begun until 1921? How did the soldiers receive Gushers on the battlefields? Did an elementary school trip leave behind the box of Gushers? Did Abraham Lincoln eat Gushers? Was it considered a luxury during the war?

 

If you’re a history buff, contact us and let us know what you think!

About NOSHKONG

A food blog. Kinda.

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